BOOK REVIEW: ‘Steam At Work: Preserved Industrial Locomotives’

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Reviewer: Michael Keith

Title: Steam At Work: Preserved Industrial Locomotives

Author: Fred Kerr

Total Number of Printed Pages: 126

Rating Scale (1: Very Poor, 10: Excellent): 7

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Although to the General Public ‘Preserved’ steam locomotives are epitomised by such well-known machines as Flying Scotsman, there are other steam locomotives which are equally interesting and worthy of attention. These are the ‘Industrials’; the small steam engines which have invariably worked tirelessly in largely-unknown areas and industries. They have a definite charm of their own and can be equally fascinating. Yet despite this, these engines are still largely overlooked. This volume is an attempt to remedy that situation and, in summary is ‘… Dedicated to those builders whose products are still in use many years after being built…’

This book is of the ‘Enthusiasts picture-book’ genre. It is a collection of colour photographs of small industrial steam locomotives built by 25 different British manufacturers. The photographs are beautiful and for those merely seeking high-quality images of small and colourful steam locomotives, this could be incentive-enough to purchase this volume. Those with a more technical interest in the subject are not left out however. As previously noted, this volume consists of 26 sections; (there being no ‘Chapters’ in the accepted sense). These are listed alphabetically on the Contents page, and are repeated as ‘Section’ headings. However, when creating these headings (and to delineate each section) the author has employed a curious form of two or three-letter abbreviations. These include (for example), AB (for Andrew Barclay Sons and Company); GR (for Grant Richie & Company) and WCI (Wigan Coal & Iron Company). As such items are not normally found in published works, they are possibly the author’s invention, perhaps created to record details in his notebooks. Their use in a published work makes for an untidy Contents page and, in the opinion of this reviewer, brings an amateurish look to the section headings. The Contents page is in turn followed by an untitled page which provides a very brief history of industrial steam locomotive construction in Great Britain. The ‘Photographic’ part of the volume then follows. Within this, each ‘Section’ commences with three self-explanatory sub-headings (titled Date Established, Location and History).  These are followed by a single paragraph listing the specific-manufacturer’s locomotives that have been preserved, and their location within the British Isles.  Although each locomotive-builder’s product is portrayed by at least one colour photograph, several have received photographs in the 12-20 image range, However, 60 photographs have been taken of the products of one manufacturer (Hunslet), with the qualification that that Company’s products are divided into two sections: Austerity Locomotives and Industrial locomotives. Each photograph is clearly captioned, and frequently-contains additional information relating to the specific locomotive it portrays or the event at which it was appearing when the image was taken. However, as some images have been transposed, it is advisable to check that captions refer to the specific locomotive in the photograph. In addition to the captions, an accompanying paragraph details the history of the individual locomotive. No Maps or an Index are provided. Regrettably, the author provides no details about the cameras or methods he used when taking the photographs.

As previously noted, this volume is of the ‘Picture book’ genre. As such it is beautiful, with the photographs being of frameable quality. It is little more. The absence of an Index requires readers to undertake unnecessary (and probably fruitless) searching, while the lack of any Maps means that the reader has no idea where the photographs were taken. This can be an especially frustrating situation for ‘off-shore’ readers for who maps are a necessary adjunct to their reading. .

Because of the quality of the images, it is possible that this book may have a wider appeal beyond the railway world; perhaps to readers who simply like quality images of small steam locomotives; or want something to share with children who are fans of Thomas the Tank Engine. It is also likely to appeal to ‘generalist’ railway enthusiasts, although those with a specific interest in preserved British industrial steam locomotives in contemporary settings are likely to find it a delight. Railway modellers with a specific interest in the subject may also find it of use.

On a Rating Scale where 1: Very Poor, 10: Excellent, I have given this volume a 7.

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BOOK REVIEW: ‘Steam At Work: Preserved Industrial Locomotives’

AND THE WINNER IS: MICHAEL KEITH’S TOP TEN BOOKS FOR 2017

To my surprise, since 31 December 2016 I have placed 46 book reviews onto this site. As those who follow me will be aware, these cover a wide range of subjects and receive varying ratings out of a scale of 1-10, with 1 being very poor and 10 being excellent. (I have never given a 10 by the way, although it has at times been very tempting to do so).

On the basis of the gradings / ratings received, I thought that it would fun to list the Top Ten Titles  of 2017. They appear below:

Famous Brand Names (Martin)

  Fighters over the Fleet (N. Freidmann)

Above the Battle (Munro)

The Royal Navy in Eastern Waters: Linchpin of Victory 1935-1942  (Boyd)

The Malayan Emergency and Indonesian Confrontation (Jackson)

British Armoured Car Operations in WW I  (Perrett)

Ashley Jackson: The Yorkshire Artist (Jackson)

British Warship Recognition Vol. 3. Cruisers (1)1865-1939 (Perkins)

Lady Lucy Houston:The Mother of the Spitfire (MacNair)

Severn Valley Railway (Vanns)

Note: Although the heading of this post refers to my Top Ten Titles for 2017, there were two additional titles which, while receiving high rating for one of their component parts, equally received poor ratings for another. They are included on the list on the strength of the ‘High’ component they contained and appear below. I will leave the reader to decide the reasons for their inclusion:

Rails Across Britain: Thirty Years of Change and Colour (Cable)

Storm Chaser (Olbinski)

Out of respect to both the titles and the authors, I will not be listing those titles which received the poorest ratings. Should you wish to know what these might be, you are, of course, quite welcome to trawl through the individual entries.

A HAPPY NEW YEAR  TO YOU ALL and thanks for visiting this site.

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AND THE WINNER IS: MICHAEL KEITH’S TOP TEN BOOKS FOR 2017

BOOK REVIEW: ‘Ashley Jackson: The Yorkshire Artist. A Lifetime of Inspiration Captured in Watercolour’

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Reviewer:  Michael Keith

Title: Ashley Jackson: The Yorkshire Artist. A Lifetime of Inspiration Captured in Watercolour

Author: Ashley Jackson

No. of Pages: 156

Rating Scale (1: very poor, 10: excellent): 9

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In this volume’s Introduction, the author writes the following: ’The Yorkshire moors have always pulled at my inner world …I can honestly say I have grown deeper in love with her. For she is a woman to me; with her soft and wild nature, the perfumed scent of heather blowing around you and her voice; the wind blowing in your face. How can you not paint her beauty when she enthrals you?’ A beautiful book, about a beautiful part of England, by an artist who is in totally besotted with his subject. As a visual declaration of his adoration, it can have few peers.

The work opens with a Forward, this being placed behind the Contents page. A Dedication follows, and is in turn followed by a Preface by the author’s daughter who has acted as complier and motivator for the volume. An Introduction follows. Within it the author sets-out his rationale for the book. The 62 colour plates which comprise the bulk of the volume then follow. Although they are originally watercolour, they have reproduced well and convey the many moods of the moors and their environs. These images are placed on the odd-numbered pages within the section, with the image’s title, description and several lines of interpretative text appearing on the opposite (even numbered) page of the work. Where necessary, photographs also accompany this narrative. The author is rightly considered to be a local treasure and unsurprisingly, the object of media attention. Within this volume, this takes the form of two pages of colour photographs in the centre of the book where-in three photographs show the artist at work while being photographed by a television crew. All concerned are in wet weather gear and sheltering under umbrellas, reinforcing the narrative that only the most ardent lover would pursue such a path in his adoration for his subject. A four-page Biography that commences on page 140 uses both photographs and text to provide background to the author’s life and artistic endeavours. It is followed by a section titled  Final Words from Ashley, within which the author pays tribute to his wife, accompanying this with a painting which above all the others holds special significance in that relationship. An Index of Paintings is place after that section. Surprisingly, this is not a list of the paintings appearing within the volume (the latter appearing on the Contents page). It is rather a list of pieces that are ‘Available to View in the Gallery’, and which may presumably be purchased at that location. The final section of this volume is titled Appendix. Within it are listed various important dates in the artist’s career, Television programmes which have featured or included him and  lists of books that he has either published or which are concerned with his art. The Appendix also includes n awards sub-section (termed Accolades). This lists academic and social awards bestowed upon the author in recognition of his status as an artist of the Yorkshire moors. A separate list appears on the final page. Titled Photograph Credits, its title is self-explanatory.

On several pages, and in addition to the explanatory texts, the author has included personal thoughts relating to the specific painting being viewed. It should be noted that the volume contains no maps of either Yorkshire itself or Great Britain. This is an omission which this reviewer finds odd, believing that it may limit the volume’s usefulness and confine sales to only those who know the area intimately. Foreign readers (and even those within the greater United Kingdom), looking to find the location of the paintings (and perhaps to even visit them), may find the lack frustrating. Finally, only the odd-numbered pages of the volume have been allocated numbers. The reasons for this are not known.

As previously noted, this is a beautiful book. The details listed above notwithstanding, this volume will undoubtedly appeal to all and any native of Yorkshire, irrespective of where they may be located; it says ‘Home’ in a way that only they will understand. The quality of the images may also appeal to those who appreciate fine art and unique water-colours. Students of meteorology may also find the depictions of Moor weather to be of interest.

On a Rating Scale where 1: very poor, 10: excellent, I have given this volume 9.

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BOOK REVIEW: ‘Ashley Jackson: The Yorkshire Artist. A Lifetime of Inspiration Captured in Watercolour’

BOOK REVIEW: ‘Railway Renaissance: Britain’s railways after Beeching’

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BOOK REVIEW

Reviewer: Michael Keith

Title: Railway Renaissance: Britain’s railways after Beeching

Author: Gareth David

Total No. of Pages: 330

Rating Scale (1: very poor, 10: excellent): 8

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On 27 March 1963, Dr. Richard Beeching presented to the British Railways Board (the group ultimately responsible for running that county’s railways) what the author of this volume describes as ‘…His draconian solution to spiralling losses on Britain’s outdated railway network, a plan which was…to spell isolation and economic stagnation for scores of communities across England, Scotland and Wales’.  This volume presents the reasons for that report and the results of its implementation. The author is quite clear about his intentions in writing this volume. He states that ‘This book will outline the dramatic changes to the [British] railway network brought about by implementation of closures planned in that 1963 report, and consider how lines which had been slated for closure have fared since they managed to escape the [Beeching] axe’. He also states that he ‘…Hope[s] to be able to convey the scale and future potential of the railway revival which has taken place since….the publication of Beeching’s original report…’ He is on a mission, and this volume is the result.

The volume’s first section (the Introduction), is placed behind the Contents page. Within it, the author provides biographical details concerning his interest in ‘Things railway’, while elaborating on his theme and providing background to his efforts in the railway preservation field.  The introduction is followed by 10 Chapters. Of these, the first nine are related to the directly closure of uneconomic sections of the British railway network and the subsequent reopening of sections closed as result of Dr. Beeching’s actions. Included within these are reproductions of letters relevant to the narrative and interviews with policymakers.  Regrettably, and despite the best efforts of all concerned, not all railways mentioned within this volume will reopen. The author lists and discusses these in Chapter 9 (titled Longer Shots). While so-doing he provides betting odds as to the likelihood that the individual line under discussion will reopen. While a reader familiar with British ‘Betting’ practice will undoubtedly find this both entertaining and educational, non-British readers unfamiliar with such matters may wonder why they have been included. Chapter 10 (titled On Reflection) .presents the author’s views on what has past, the current situation for railways in Great Britain and his thoughts about what the future could possibly hold for the re-emerging national railway network. Within each Chapter subheadings refer to specific sections of railway relevant to that chapter’s over-all narrative. Four Appendices follow Chapter 10. Two of these use a table format to record ‘Lines opened or re-opened since Beeching’ (Appendix I) and ‘Stations opened or Re-opened since Beeching’ (Appendix II). Within each Table, additional information is provided through the use of chapter-specific end-notes. These are sequentially numbered with their relevant citations appear at the end of each Appendix. Although there is no designated ‘stand-alone’ Bibliography, Appendix III carries the Bibliography subheading and acts in that capacity. It records the printed titles accessed during the preparation of this book.  Appendix IV lists ‘Campaign and Promotional Groups’ involved in railway and transport activism throughout the United Kingdom. The volume contains numerous photographs; both coloured and monochrome. Of these, some are sourced, some are not. In addition it also contains reproductions of schematic maps, tickets and a map of North Wales. There is however, no reference to either maps, tickets or photographs on the Contents page or within the Index. Curiously, the volume contains no maps/s of either Great Britain or its past or present national railway network/s in their entirety.

That the author is extremely-passionate about his subject is very evident, although the end-result (at least for this reviewer), is a volume best-described as being ‘Intense’.  That detail notwithstanding (and due to  the quantity and quality of the information it contains), this book has the potential to become  an authoritative work on its subject  It is likely to be of  use to individuals and organisations involved in the reopening of railways closed as a result of Doctor Beeching’ Report. In addition, groups and Councils involved in regional development within the United Kingdom may also find it informative and useful. Due to the photographs it contains, modellers of Twenty-first Century British railways may also find that it has use as a source book for rolling stock, infrastructure and land-forms.

On a Rating Scale where 1: very poor, 10: excellent, I have given this volume an 8.

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BOOK REVIEW: ‘Railway Renaissance: Britain’s railways after Beeching’

BOOK REVIEW: ‘C-130 Hercules: A History’.

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BOOK REVIEW

Reviewer: Michael Keith

Title: C-130 Hercules: A History

Author: Martin Bowman

Total Number of Printed Pages: 320

Rating Scale (1: Very Poor, 10: Excellent) 6

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On the opening page of Chapter I of this volume, the author states ‘Everyone knows the Hercules – even those who are unaware of its C-130 military designation know exactly what it does, this bulky, squat but lovable aircraft with the reassuring face of a friendly seal pup and whaled tail’. It is a fair summation of both the aircraft and the book; the latter being about the many faces and uses of the former.

The volume consists of 12 Chapters, there being no Introduction prior to Chapter 1.Within these the reader is introduced to the personnel who flew (and still fly) the aeroplane. It should be noted however that many of the Chapters take the form of personal reminiscences that have been sourced from other publications; they are not original to this volume. Technical details relating to the C-130’s development, variants, and uses in both military and civilian roles are also provided. Where additional information is required, this is presented in the form of sequentially-numbered and chapter-specific end-notes, the relevant citations appearing at the end of each Chapter.  Three Appendices follow the Chapters. Their self-explanatory titles are: Commercial and Humanitarian Operators past and Present (Appendix I); World Military User Dictionary (Appendix II); and Models and Variants (Appendix III). A single-page Acknowledgments completes the book. Within it, the author thanks those who assisted him in writing the volume. Numerous colour and black and white photographs appear in the book, some being sourced, some not. Their existence is not however mentioned on the Contents page.  The single map that the book contains, refers to a specific series of events narrated within Chapter 3 (The Last flight of the ‘Stray Goose’). The volume contains no plans, 3-view drawings or diagrams relating to its subject. There is also no Bibliography, Glossary (To explain the myriad military acronyms that occur throughout the volume) or Index.

When requesting this volume for review, this reviewer had certain expectations of it. One of these was that he would be able to find specific locations, units and variants of the basic C-130 airframe quickly and easily through the use of an Index. In that expectation he was wrong; there is no Index. Perhaps spoiled by his experience with other books of a similar nature, he also expected to find at least a basic 3-view drawing of the aircraft. In this he was again wrong, Although regrettable, these failings could possibly have been overlooked. However, what could not be overlooked was the complete absence of any reference to either Australia or New Zealand in the World Military User Directory (Appendix II); this despite an entire chapter (Chapter 9 The Antipodean Hercules) being devoted to these two air arms!! The discovery of proof-reading errors was also not helpful, and created an overall impression of a ‘sloppy’ book, while raising doubts about the volume’s veracity and authority on its subject.

The previous details notwithstanding, this volume is likely to appeal to all and anyone who has been associated with the C-130 in whatever capacity, with Vietnam-era C-130 aircrew in particular likely to find some of the content nostalgic. Those with a more-general interest in the type may also find the volume worthy of their attention. The colour photographs may be of use to both aircraft and military modellers.

On a Rating Scale where 1: Very Poor, 10: Excellent, I have given this volume a 6.

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BOOK REVIEW: ‘C-130 Hercules: A History’.

BOOK REVIEW: ‘The Turbomotive Stanier’s Advanced Pacific’

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Reviewer: Michael Keith

Title: The Turbomotive Stanier’s Advanced Pacific

Author: Tim Hillier-Graves

Total Number of Pages:  206

Rating Scale (1: Very Poor, 10: Excellent): 7

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Technology advances in various ways and enroute to its final ‘success’ can sometimes follow paths that are ultimately fruitless. Such was the fate of the subject of this monograph; the London Midland and Scottish Railway’s (LMS) ‘Turbomotive’. The “Turbomotive’ was the physical form of an idea that, in theory, had lots to offer, yet which, due to circumstances outside the control of its proponents, ultimately proved a technological dead-end.

The motivation behind what became known as the ‘Turbomotive’ was a simple one: economy and simplicity. Its premise was that, by incorporating a miniaturised version of a highly-successful maritime propulsion system (the steam turbine), costs could be reduced, greater efficiency achieved, and money saved. The idea was not a new one, but the way that the LMS dealt with it was. This volume records what was designed and why, the results of actual ‘in service’ experience, and, ultimately, what happened to the chief participant: LMS locomotive No. 6202; the ‘Turbomotive’. It is a very interesting tale.

An Acknowledgements section follows the Contents page. Within it the author thanks those who contributed to the volume. Curiously, the sources of the volume’s photographs are also indicated within this section, rather than in a ‘Sources’ section as might be expected. For ease of use, when notating the photographs, the author has used abbreviations to indicate their sources.  He has placed the abbreviations in brackets after each ‘source’ that is named within the Acknowledgements section. Where photographs appear within the volume, these abbreviations appear below the individual captions. An Introduction section follows. Within it, the author details his reasons for writing the volume and his familial relationship with the locomotive. The Introduction is followed by the 10 Chapters comprising the main part of the volume.  The locomotive which is the subject of this volume was involved in a major three-train railway accident (known as The Harrow Railway Disaster) at Harrow on 8 October 1952; an accident which ultimately led to its scrapping. The scale of the disaster prompted an Official Enquiry, and Chapter 1 is devoted to this, with particular reference to the actions of its crew during the accident. Chapters 2-8 detail the reasons for the creation of the locomotive and its ‘in service’ history. Chapter 9 returns once more to the accident, discussing it in greater detail, and describing the circumstances which ultimately led to the subject locomotive’s withdrawal from service and scrapping. Chapter 10 discusses the locomotive’s historical relevance. Eight Appendices follow.  These cover a wide variety of topics relevant to the larger narrative. They include The Science of Steam Turbines (Appendix 2) and 6202 – Evolution of a Locomotive (1935-1952) (Appendix 7) amongst their subjects. The latter uses plans to depict the evolution of the locomotive throughout its life. A single-page Reference Sources section is placed behind the Appendices. This lists the sources of non-photographic material used within the volume. A three-page Index completes the volume. Numerous monochrome photographs and plans appear within the book, together with two half-tone advertisements.  There is however no indication of their existence on the Contents page. An eight page ‘colour’ section is also provided. This contains illustrations relevant to the narrative, but again, its existence is not acknowledged on the Contents page.

This reviewer found this volume to be both informative and well-written. It was however let down by the ‘small details’. Of these the most obvious concerned punctuation. Although the spines of both the dust jacket and the volume itself have the title correctly written as The Turbomotive, Staniers Advanced Pacific, inexplicably the comma following Turbomotive omitted from both the ‘face’ of the dust jacket and the volume’s two title pages, In addition, the apostrophe is omitted from Stanier’s on the same two title pages. The absence of both the comma’s and apostrophe’s from such important locations implied (perhaps unfairly), that similar ‘carelessness’ might be found within the work. It was not a good introduction to a volume purporting to be an ‘authoritative’ narrative. That the Contents page carried no indication of the existence of photographs etc. did not help. It was also noticeable that although the word ‘Pacific’ was used frequently throughout the volume, no explanation was given as to exactly what a ‘Pacific’ might be. As non-railway readers might not know that, at its most basic, the term refers to a steam locomotive with a 4-6-2 wheel arrangement, an explanation would have been helpful. A Glossary to explain technical terms could also have been of value.  .

This volume is likely to appeal to several different groups. These could include devotees of the LMS and those with an interest in both British Railways (the LMS successor) specifically, and British rail transport in general. Railway modellers and artists interested in ‘trains’ are likely to find the images and diagrams informative. Transport historians interested in British transport history and the machines that were employed could also find it worthy of their attention. Engineers with an interest in turbines and turbine development vis-à-vis rail transportation might also find the volume of interest.

On a Rating Scale where 1: Very Poor, 10: Excellent, I have given it a 7.

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BOOK REVIEW: ‘The Turbomotive Stanier’s Advanced Pacific’