BOOK REVIEW: ‘Taming the Atlantic: The History of Man’s Battle with the World’s Toughest Ocean’

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Reviewer: Michael Keith

Title: Taming the Atlantic: The History of Man’s Battle with the World’s Toughest Ocean

Author: Dag Pike

Total Number of Pages: 222

Rating Scale (1: Very Poor, 10: Excellent): 8

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In Winds, Currents and Wild Seas, the introductory chapter to this volume, the author describes a close encounter he had with a storm in the North Atlantic [or ‘Western’] Ocean. He concludes ‘…The experience taught me to observe due reverence and respect for the Western Ocean, a wild stretch of sea that for centuries has been both a route for commerce and a barrier to trade’. Although the Atlantic Ocean actually has two sections (‘North’ and ‘South’) this book is primarily about its Northern section and, delivered with ‘Due reverence and respect’, it details mankind’s battle with what the author terms ‘The world’s Toughest Ocean’. It is a fascinating read.

The volume is prefaced with an Acknowledgements section in which the author thanks those who assisted him in its writing. Unusually, he also thanks ‘…The millions of people who have crossed the Atlantic in a variety of ships and boats…’; for this Reviewer, a nice touch. The twelve Chapters forming the main part of the book then follow. The previously-mentioned Chapter 1 (Winds, Currents and Wild Seas) acts as both a precis for the volume and a scene-setter for what is to come. In addition to the author’s personal narrative (and as the title suggests), it also details the geographical and atmospheric phenomena which contribute to the whole ‘Toughest Ocean’ appellation. Effectively, it acts as a base for what follows.  The geography and phenomena thus established, Chapters 2-9 narrate the maritime history of the ocean, and traces the exploration and exploitation of the North Atlantic Ocean over many centuries. The technological developments that occurred during this period are also explored, while the at-times bizarre attempts by individuals and groups to cross the ocean under their own power and for their own reasons are also investigated and assessed. Chapter 10 (An Ocean in Turmoil) returns again to the theme of the North Atlantic’s weather and waves, with the author’s personal experiences again adding a human touch to the narrative. Perhaps inevitably, Chapter 10 is followed by another Chapter (Number. 11) titled Disasters on the Atlantic. Within this the expected names appear (RMS Titanic being one such example), together with other, lesser known, vessels, their common theme being that they all fell victim to the ocean’s wrath. Chapter 12 (The Future) is the final part of the volume’s main section. In it the author reflects on future possibilities and liabilities associated with the Atlantic Ocean, offering his thoughts about the sea, ship design and human nature while so-doing. A Select Bibliography placed after Chapter 12 records the sources used when writing this book, while a six-page Index completes it.  The volume contains a large number of monochrome prints, and black and white and colour photographs (some sourced, the majority not), together with an assortment of Maps, Plans Diagrams, Charts and Tables that relate to the narrative. While informatively captioned, the existence the Maps, plans etc. is not noted on either the Index or Contents pages. Unusually, and  although there is a ‘local’ map (Captioned ‘The North Atlantic Ocean stretches from the Tropics to the Arctic’) there is no Mercator-type expanded global map to precisely-fix the Atlantic Ocean’s location on Planet Earth. For this reviewer, it is an unhelpful omission. Unfortunately there is also no Glossary to enlighten non-maritime readers as to the meanings of the nautical terms that the book contains. What (for example) is an ‘Astrolabe’ (page 29)? In the absence of an informative description, a reader cannot know.

While well written and informative, for this reviewer, this book was let down in several areas. Numerous unsourced quotes appear within it (Alain Gerbault’s on pages 102-103 being but one example), but with no supporting citations, their authenticity is inevitably suspect, and they have little value to researchers. The Index should also be treated with some caution. A random ‘Index’ search for La Dauphin (page 27) and  Mary Celeste (page 195) found nothing, while curiously, although the Flying Enterprise (page 197) was also missing from the Index, her captain (Curt Carlson) appears within it. As these ‘errors’ were found during a random search, there is no way to know what else may be missing, and (at least for this reviewer), the authority of the Index is now in doubt. Small grammatical errors were also noticed.

This volume is eminently readable, there being no doubt that the author of knows his subject. As a result (and despite the previously mentioned ‘failings’), it is likely to have broad appeal. It likely to be of interest to both Historians with an interest in ‘Things maritime’ and the ‘Weekend sailor’ who just wants to read and learn more about the ocean at his doorstep.  Those who love ‘ships and the sea’ in a more general way are also likely to find this book of interest, while a reader looking for something for a wet Sunday afternoon, will probably find it worthy of their attention. Ship modellers may also find some of the images of use.

On a Rating Scale where 1: Very Poor, 10: Excellent I have given this volume an 8.

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BOOK REVIEW: ‘Taming the Atlantic: The History of Man’s Battle with the World’s Toughest Ocean’

BOOK REVIEW: ‘HORSES IN THE BRITISH ARMY; 1790 TO 1950’

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Reviewer: Michael Keith

Title: Horses in the British Army 1750-1950

Author: Janet Macdonald

Total Number of Printed Pages: 208

Rating Scale (1: Very Poor, 10: Excellent): 5

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One thing must be made very clear from the start. Despite its title, this volume is largely-concerned with the acquisition, training, care and general maintenance of the horse (as well other creatures when they occurred), within the British army. It does not cover actual military operations in any depth, with those that are mentioned, being adjuncts to the greater ‘care’ narrative.

To quote the dustcover ‘…This book encompasses the whole spectrum of horses in the British army over a 200 year period, from their acquisition and training, through their care and feeding and their transportation to theatres of war overseas. It also covers the selection and training of their riders and has a brief chapter on other animals used by the British army’.

Within the volume itself, a List of Plates is placed after the Contents page. This repeats the captions of images appearing in an eight-page section placed at the centre of the volume. Of these images, only one contains an indication of its source. That list is in turn followed by a short three-entry explanatory section titled Author’s Note, together with an Acknowledgments section. The latter thanks those who assisted the author in creating the volume. A Glossary is next. This is three pages in length and clarifies many of the terms used throughout the book. An Introduction follows. In it, the author sets the scene for the 15 Chapters which form the largest part of the volume. Each Chapter is devoted to one aspect of the military use of horses as practiced by the British army, with particular emphasis on their care and maintenance.  Where necessary, subsections within the Chapter provide additional information relevant to the matter under discussion within the larger Chapter. A 12-page Appendix follows. Within it, subsections are again used to provide additional information not covered within the previously-mentioned Chapters. The volume uses Endnotes to provide additional information within the chapters. These are sequentially-numbered within each Chapter, their citations appearing in a designated Notes section placed behind the Appendix. A four-page Bibliography placed after the Notes section, records the resources used during the preparation of the volume. An Index completes the work.

This reviewer was interested in learning why the title’s very specific 1950 cut-off date was chosen, this volume being requested on that basis. In that expectation he was disappointed!   Despite repeated perusals of the volume, he still has no idea why 1950 was chosen; or why it couldn’t equally have been 1955, 1975; or 2017!  The absence of such information suggests that the date was a convenient number of the author’s own choosing. There is nothing to indicate otherwise. That this reviewer found only one section within the volume that was even remotely near the title’s 1950 date would seem to confirm that hypothesis. Titled After the Second World War, and appearing as a sub-section within Chapter 3 (Getting the Horses), this single-page subsection was concerned with the disposal of surplus animals. It had no relevance to the title.  As previously noted, within the individual Chapters, Endnote-type citations are used to provide additional information. Their use is not however widespread, and the volume contains many instances where this reviewer believes they should have been used but were not. These include both quotes (those on pages 11 and 12 being but two examples) and sentences. On page 181, an uncited example of the latter (and when referring to the use of porters to carry military equipment, states  ‘…Numerous humans…in some countries including …New Zealand [were used]…to carry supplies and munitions’  With no citations to establish / prove the accuracy of such statements, they might just as well be imagined. Difficulties also arose with ‘terminology’. What (for example) is a Mallein test (pages 23 and 110)? No explanation is given, and the reader is none-the-wiser. Military rank and unit abbreviations are similarly treated, and a list of commonly used military abbreviations and ranks would have been beneficial. A peculiar use of tenses was also evident, with the subsection Yaks in Chapter 14 being but one such example, The Index is also problematic. While reviewing this volume, this writer had occasion to randomly search the Index for several words. Amongst these were Shabraque (used on pages 133, 144 and xiii), with a search finding only a single Index entry (that for page.133), the other two entries being evidently overlooked or ignored by the Indexer. Similarly, the words Otago and Otago Saddle, despite being mentioned on page 142, were also not found within the Index. New Zealand itself (mentioned twice on page 142 and again on page181), garnered no mention. As these are the results of random searches, there is no way of knowing what else might be missing.

Because of its emphasis on ‘horse care’ this volume will probably appeal to readers who are primarily ‘horse-enthusiasts’. Readers seeking information about the care of horses within a very specific military environment may also find it worthy of their attention. Readers interested in combat use of the horse within the British army are certainly likely to find some information relating to that use. However, as already noted, this is as an adjunct to the larger narrative. The 1945-1950 period in particular is not covered with any degree of adequacy.

On a Rating Scale where 1: Very Poor, 10: Excellent, I have given this volume a 5.

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BOOK REVIEW: ‘HORSES IN THE BRITISH ARMY; 1790 TO 1950’

BOOK REVIEW: ‘Ocean Liners: An Illustrated History’

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Reviewer: Michael Keith

Title: Ocean Liners: An Illustrated History

Author: Peter Newall

Total Number of Printed Pages: 192

Rating Scale (1: Very Poor, 10: Excellent): 7

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In his Foreword to this volume, Dr Stephen M. Payne describes this book in the following manner: ‘Ocean Liners provides a very informative voyage through the history of many of the ships, the advancing technologies that drove innovation and the companies that operated them’. It is a reasonable summation.

The volume opens with the previously-mentioned Foreword. Placed after the Contents page, this is in turn followed by the author’s Introduction in which he precis’ what is to follow and explains that what he has ‘…Tried to achieve with this book is a balanced coverage of the 100-year history of ocean liners…’ An Acknowledgements section on the same page thanks those who assisted with the book’s creation. The nine Chapters which form the bulk of the volume then follow. These cover the development of the ocean liner from its Nineteenth Century origins to its final demise in the 1970’s. Within each Chapter, subsections provide information about a specific technological or historical development, each subsection being accompanied by one (sometimes two), monochrome photographs of vessels which are relevant to the specific narrative. An Index completes the work.

The volume is of the ‘Enthusiasts Picture Book’ genre and it consequently contains numerous photographs. These are of high quality and have reproduced well. They are however, unsourced. Numerous shipping companies are mentioned within the text, many being abbreviated; P&O (the Peninsular and Oriental Steam Navigation Company) being one such example. There is however, no central list for either the Companies or the abbreviations. There are no maps.  The volume’s Index contains the names of those vessels which appear as illustrations within it. Where a named / illustrated vessel’s sisters are mentioned in the context of the narrative, these are frequently (but not always) omitted from the Index; Lhasa, Lama and Lunka (page 47) being a case in point. The inclusion or omission of such names appears to be random. Curiously, where a vessel has been renamed (and the new name is  specifically mentioned within the narrative), no Index entry for the new name appears. For readers who might know only the ‘rename’, this lack could prove problematic when undertaking a search. The owning Companies, the builders who constructed them and their countries of origin are also not mentioned. While it is probable that such information will be found within the volume, the absence of relevant Index entries renders this invisible to the reader.  With no certainty that what is being searched for actually exists, for this reviewer this lack is a major failing. It will  inevitably impact on the volume’s usefulness as a reference source. In addition, and although various ‘nautical’ terms are used throughout the volume, no interpretative Glossary is provided. What (for example) does the abbreviation ‘gt’ mean, and what is a ‘knot’? In the absence of an explanation, the layman-reader cannot know.

This is a ‘Beautiful’ book; the images being a pleasure to look at.  As a result it may well appeal to readers (even those with little nautical interest) who seek beautiful black and white images of beautiful ships. Serious researchers may however be disappointed, the previously-mentioned ‘difficulties’ with the Index et al making searching for specific information more of a chore than should be necessary. Ship Modellers with an interest in specific passenger vessels are likely to find this volume a useful resource.

On a Rating Scale where 1: Very Poor, 10: Excellent, I have given this volume a 7.

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BOOK REVIEW: ‘Ocean Liners: An Illustrated History’

Book Review: ‘Cathedrals of Britain: North of England & Scotland’

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Reviewer:  Michael Keith

Title: Cathedrals of Britain: North of England & Scotland

Editor: Bernadette Fallon

No. of Pages: 122

Rating Scale (1: very poor, 10: excellent): 8

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In her introduction to this volume, the author observes that ‘Cathedrals provide a continuous link to the living past…They are places of worship and prayer…but also…they are places to stand and stare and marvel’. It is a fair assessment of the book’s content.

An Acknowledgments section is placed after the Contents page. In it the author thanks ‘…Everybody who generously gave their time, experience and support to this book’, before listing the individuals and organisations who contributed to the volume. An eight-page Introduction follows. This provides historical and ecclesiastical background to the material contained within the eight Chapters which form the majority of the volume. Each Chapter focuses on one specific cathedral. Within the specific Chapter, subheadings are used to provide details about the specific structure and to highlight various little ‘oddities’ which are unique to the edifice. Although the volume is nominally about a specific structure, at the end of each chapter a ‘…Where to go and what to do’ section appears. This provides additional information about the surrounding district and of any attractions which might be of interest to a visitor. A Glossary placed after the last Chapter (Number Eight: Aberdeen) clarifies the various ecclesiastical, architectural and historical terms which appear within the volume. It is in turn followed by a section titled Further Reading. In the absence of a designated Bibliography, this appears to function in that role. An Index completes the volume. Black and White photographs from a variety of sources are used to illustrate salient points within each Chapter. The Contents page and the Index carry no acknowledgement of their existence. The volume contains no Maps, a detail which could reduce its value to intending ‘Day Trippers’ and to international visitors unfamiliar with both British geography and public transport systems. Although the volume contains numerous Quotes (that by George Cavendish on page 65 being but one example), these are not referenced, reducing the volume’s value as an  historical source.

The author concludes her Introduction to this work with the words ‘Let us take you on a marvellous journey…’ As an invitation it has no peer and (the previously-noted ‘faults’ notwithstanding), for this reviewer the ‘journey’ was indeed ‘marvellous’. This is a delightful, well-written and easily-readable volume. It is definitely ‘Enjoyable’. For that the author is to be commended.

Due to its subject and the accessibility of the structures discussed within it, this volume should have wide appeal. Despite the lack of maps, the previously-mentioned ‘Day Tripping’ fraternity and international visitors could no doubt find it to be a useful souvenir of a visit or visits that they may have made to any of the Cathedrals that the volume mentions. Some might even care to use it as a ‘guide’ and attempt to ‘collect’ them all. Readers with an interest in ‘British’ architecture in general, and religious structures in particular, may also find it of interest. Readers interested in the more unusual aspects of British architecture and even folk-lore may also find it of interest. Due to the unusual items appearing within its pages, the volume may also be a useful reference book for pub-trivia quizzes. Those seeking a ‘fun’ read on a wet afternoon could also do worse than give this volume their attention.

On a Rating Scale where 1: very poor, 10: excellent: I have given this volume an 8.

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Book Review: ‘Cathedrals of Britain: North of England & Scotland’

Book Review: ‘Narrow Gauge Railway Stamps’*

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Reviewer: Michael Keith

Title: Narrow Gauge Railway Stamps*

Author: Howard Piltz

Total Number of Printed Pages: 64

Rating Scale (1: Very Poor, 10: Excellent): 6

* The title is disputed

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The Introduction to this work contains a subsection titled Coming Together with Works of Art. Within the latter, the author notes ‘…That in stamps one could find the wonderful combination of transport history told within a glorious gallery of miniature works of art’. It is a fair summation of what is to follow.

An Introduction appears behind the Contents page. Within the former the author uses subsections to provide details about himself; the reasons behind the creation of the work and the volume’s format and content. An interpretation of relevant philatelic terms is also given.  Confusingly (and at a point seven pages into the Introduction section) a separate four page section titled Narrow Gauge Railways appears. Bearing the page numbers 13 – 16, it is in turn followed by pages 17-20 of the Introduction section. As the Contents page indicates that a section titled Narrow Gauge Railways starts on page 13 and is in turn followed by another section titled The British Isles on page 20, some confusion results. The volume contains no Chapters per se’. There are instead nine un-numbered Sections (including the Introduction) which fulfil that function. Six of these Sections form the focus of the volume. Placed in its centre, these are arranged in respect of geographical land masses, with The British Isles, Asia and The Americas being but three such examples. Subsections within each geographical area name specific nations, provide images of their stamps, then precis’ their postal history and that of their railway systems. A final section (titled Collecting) is placed at the rear of the volume. This discusses the rationale behind stamp collecting (albeit with a focus on the specific topic of Railway stamps), and is accompanied by a subsection titled Looking after Stamps, the latter’s title being self-explanatory. No Index, Bibliography or Maps appear within the book. As one would expect, the volume is illustrated by images of all sorts of trains on postage stamps. The range is wide and includes examples from all parts of the globe and both ‘working’ units and those that have been preserved. Some stamps appear individually, some as part of a larger set. With one exception (on page 25) none are captioned and the Contents page carries no mention of their existence.

Regrettably, if asked to describe this volume on one word, this reviewer would have to say ‘Confused’. In addition to the previously-noted ‘Insertion’ of one section within another, the author of this volume is seemingly unable to decide its purpose. Is it a book about stamps? Is it one about trains, horses (as per the image appearing on page 25), or is it in fact something else – and if so, what? To compound this ‘difficulty’, the volume also appears to have an alternative title, albeit one which may in fact hint at its actual purpose. While both the Cover and Title pages state unequivocally that the volume is called Narrow Gauge Railway Stamps, the Page Header on the left-hand (even) pages throughout the volume inform the reader that the title is in fact Narrow Gauge Railway Stamps – a Collector’s Guide. Which is correct? There is no way to know, although the reviewer suspects that the Header-title may be the more accurate of the two available options. The images of pristine envelopes, First Day Covers and proof blocks of stamps with which the volume is illustrated would seem to reinforce the possibility.  The lack of both an Index and a Map also adds to the confusion; the reader having to both guess where specific nations actually might be, while having no certainty that they have even been included within the work. Readers seeking images of specific trains are similarly doomed to what could be ultimately-fruitless searching. Railway ‘Enthusiasts’ interested in technical specifications or seeking a ‘learned treatise’ on motive power etc. will also be disappointed.  And the previously-mentioned, horse?  Apparently a winner of an ‘English’ horse race (the ‘Grand National’) in 1983, it was named after a lighthouse located at Corbiere on the island of Jersey (appearing as a background within the stamp). Although Corbiere was the terminus of a now-extinct narrow gauge railway, the connection between animal and railway is (at best), very tenuous.

Although Philatelists are its primary focus, readers interested in the more exotic permutations of ‘trains’, may also find it of interest, with even children perhaps getting pleasure from viewing Thomas’ relatives. Despite the images being stamp-centred, readers who just want ‘nice’ pictures of trains might also find it worthy of their attention. Artists with an interest in ‘Things railway’, might also find the volume a useful resource.

On a Rating Scale where Rating Scale where 1: Very Poor, 10: Excellent, I have given this volume a 6.

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Book Review: ‘Narrow Gauge Railway Stamps’*

BOOK REVIEW: ‘World Naval Review 2018’

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Reviewer: Michael Keith

Title: World Naval Review 2018

Editor: Conrad Waters

No. of Pages: 192

Rating Scale (1: very poor, 10: excellent): 7

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To look forwards it is sometimes necessary to look back and although its’ title suggests this volume is a review of ‘things naval’ for 2018, in fact it isn’t. Rather, by virtue of being written and published in 2017, it is a ‘forecast’ of what the editor and his associates believe will be likely to happen militarily on the world’s oceans during 2018. It is simultaneously both a review and a preview.

The volume has no Chapters per se’ but consists of four Sections which function in a similar manner. Each section deals with a specific subject (for example World Fleet Reviews; Section 2; Technological Reviews; Section 4), and within each Section subsections provide more detail about a specific part of the aforementioned section. In many instances these subsections contain even smaller sections which fulfil the same function and provide even greater detail; the subsection Singapore, which forms part of the Regional Review – Asia and the Pacific (Section 2.2) of Section 2 World Fleet Reviews, being a case in point.  Within each larger Section (Chapter) the subsections follow a Section-specific numbering sequence. In Section 4 (For example), the sequence is 4.1; 4.2; 4.3 etc.  Where additional information is necessary, notes are provided at the end of the individual Sections (Chapters). These are keyed to sequentially-occurring and chapter-specific numbers within the text. The previously-mentioned subsections have been contributed by a variety of authors (Eight in total), these individuals being evidently experts in their fields. The Editor has contributed an Introduction along with various articles throughout the volume. A single-page Contributors section placed after Sub-section 4.4 is the volume’s final section. Numerous photos from a variety of sources appear throughout the book, together with tables, graphs, half-tone and line drawings. No mention of their existence appears on the Contents page. Surprisingly (for a volume which presents itself as being ‘authoritative’ on its subject), there is no Index, a detail which makes searching for a specific item difficult, there being no guarantee that what is being searched-for will even be located.  Such an omission is surprising and must inevitably reduce this book’s value and usefulness. Numerous acronyms are scattered throughout the volume, yet no central Glossary is provided to enable quick reference to their meanings should the need arise. Despite publication-sources being referred-to within each Section-end Notes section, there is also no stand-alone Bibliography. No Maps are provided.

While the lack of a Glossary, Maps and evidence of Photographs etc. is a cause for concern, for this reviewer, the complete lack of an Index in an otherwise authoritative and well-written volume is a major failure. The purpose of an Index is to be able to locate specific information quickly and easily, the corollary being that its absence must make information-location both slow and difficult. As already noted, searching through this volume confirms the corollary’s premise! Where quick reference could be crucial, to have to fruitlessly search through innumerable pages could, at minimum, be farcical…

The provision of an Index in future editions of this title is strongly recommended.

The Index and other limitations notwithstanding, this volume provides a comprehensive coverage of the contemporary international naval scene. On that basis it is likely to find a home on many military bookshelves, while readers with ties to the defence industry could also find it useful. Naval and aviation modellers interested in ‘modern’ naval equipment   may also find that this volume of use, while civilian readers with a more general interest in naval and military matters, international relations, or ships in general, may also find it worthy of their attention. .

In precis, this is an excellent, comprehensive and well-written book. For this reviewer however, it was let down by the small but important details, especially in respect of the Index.

On a rating scale of 1-10 where 1: very poor, 10: excellent, I would give this volume a 7.

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BOOK REVIEW: ‘World Naval Review 2018’

BOOK REVIEW: ‘ A History of Birds’

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Reviewer: Michael Keith

Title:  A History of Birds

Author: Simon Wills

Total Number of Pages: 180

Rating Scale (1: Very Poor, 10: Excellent): 8

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In the final paragraph of this volume’s Introduction, the author writes the following: ‘The world would be a miserable place without birds, and in this book I hope to show how the relationship between us and our avian counterparts has evolved. Our modern attitudes are very much shaped by our ancestor’s beliefs and experiences’. It is an excellent precis of the book’s content.

In addition to the afore-mentioned paragraph, the Introduction also discusses the place that birds have played in human society throughout the centuries. It is followed by an Acknowledgements section, within-which those who assisted with this volume are thanked. The 30 sections which comprise the majority of the volume follow. The book contains no Chapters per se’, but rather Sections devoted to individual bird types. These are unnumbered, but include both the common (Blackbird) and the exotic (Flamingo). Although not stated, the qualification for inclusion with this volume seems to be that at some stage such birds have either been resident in the British Isles or are familiar parts of British culture (the Ostrich being a case in point). Within each Section, the reader is introduced to the subject, and given details of both its behaviour and its place in British and European legend and folklore. Subsections enclosed in boxes within each section provide additional, frequently-idiosyncratic details about the bird-type under discussion.  The Seagull on Stage (page 67) is one such example.  Where appropriate, the author includes personal reminiscences about the bird he is describing. The volume contains numerous illustrations. These are largely photographic in nature and comprise both monochrome and colour images. However, where required by the narrative, there are also reproductions of etchings, drawings, manuscripts and trademarks. While the sources of some of these photographs / images etc. are noted, many do not provide that detail. The Index and Contents pages contain no reference to the existence of illustrations within the work.  Numerous quotes also appear throughout the volume. Regrettably these lack source-citations, and as a result their authenticity must inevitably be questioned. A two-page Index completes the volume. Despite the fact that some species are range-specific while others migrate over considerable distances, the book contains no Maps.

That this volume is readable and well-researched is very evident. This reviewer does however have reservations concerning the Index. During the review process, words were randomly sought from within the Index.  Included were such terms as Publius Claudius Pulcher (page 13), Ostrich Racing (page 104) and Heyhoe (page 176).  No Index entry was found for any of these terms. In addition, although the Index noted that the term Falconry appeared on pages 34 and 71-72, that term also appeared on pages 126 and 127. Why the latter entries were omitted is unknown. As these were the results of random Index searches; what else may be missing cannot be known.

As already noted this volume is readable and well-researched. Despite the previously noted ‘limitations’, it is likely to have wide reader appeal. ‘Bird lovers’ of all persuasions and interest-levels are likely to find it a delight and it could well become a standard reference work with their libraries.  Readers who simply see a bird and want to learn about it, are also likely to find this volume of use. The unusual information it contains may also appeal to the compilers of ‘Pub-quiz’ competitions, while visual artists could find the photographs a useful resource.

On a Rating Scale where 1: Very Poor, 10: Excellent, I have given this volume an 8.

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BOOK REVIEW: ‘ A History of Birds’