BOOK REVIEW: ‘THE KAISER’S BATTLEFLEET: GERMAN CAPITAL SHIPS 1871-1918’

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Reviewer:  NZ Crown Mines

Title: The Kaiser’s Battlefleet: German Capital Ships 1871-1918

Author: Aidan Dodson

Total No. of Pages: 256

Rating Scale (1: very poor; 10: excellent): 8½

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‘Comprehensive’ is a rarely-used word in the Twenty-first  Century, yet it effectively summarises this work; a ‘comprehensive’ examination and analysis of the Imperial German Navy’s battleship and battlecruiser fleet from their origins to their final destruction.

In 1914 (and on the eve of Wold War I), the Imperial German Navy was the second largest in the world, with its fleet of battleships and battlecruisers being of a standard comparable with that of the Royal Navy. This work chronicles the origins, rise and demise of this fleet, while providing details of the political, economic and geographic climate from which it grew and evolved. The range of information that the author provides is surpassing and all-encompassing, and I would recommend this volume to anyone interested in German naval history from 1871 to 1945. The book consists of two sections and three Appendices. The first section (The Rise and Fall of the Battlefleet) occupies the majority of the book. It details the geo-political background which contributed to the construction of the battlefleet, provides histories of both individual vessels and classes, and their deployment in naval service. The histories of battleship-type vessels that Germany sold or gave to other nations is also detailed, as are those that were taken as Prizes after both World Wars. The second section (Technical and Career Data) provides line illustrations of the vessels themselves, and includes drawings of the various unbuilt projects and design competitions which contributed to the evolution of the fleet. The Appendices cover armament, trial and German naval organisation.

The book contains many clear photographs which will provide a useful resource for any student of the era and of contemporary German naval practice. It also contains an informative Introduction, and a list of Abbreviations.  Notes on German practice in respect of the naming and classification of warships and a Table of Contents are included together with a comprehensive Index and a multi-page Bibliography.  Footnotes are provided where necessary. A Ship Timeline section inside the front cover (and repeated at the back of the book) covers the individual career of every vessel in graphic form.

Although for this reviewer the vast majority of the volume is excellent, the Footnotes provided a small distraction from an otherwise enjoyable read. In conformance with well-established practice, the Footnotes in this work appear in small font at the bottom of the column to which they refer. There is however no cross-column dividing line to separate them from the main text. The reader is thus continually led into the footnote area with a consequent disruption of the smooth flow of the narrative. A line separating the Footnotes from the main text would have been appreciated. A small detail certainly, and to many readers of little consequence. However, for this reviewer it made reading less enjoyable than it should otherwise have been.

In precis, this work is clear, concise and comprehensive and would be a valuable addition to the book collections of anyone interested in German and European history, the Imperial German Navy and large naval vessels. It is an invaluable resource.

On a Rating Scale where 1: very poor; 10: excellent, I would give it an 8½.

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nzcrownmines is also available for book reviewing Contact nzcrownmines@gmail.com

 

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BOOK REVIEW: ‘THE KAISER’S BATTLEFLEET: GERMAN CAPITAL SHIPS 1871-1918’

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